Relationships are work (in a good way)

Marriage, a journey in progress

Whoever said marriage is easy has not been married. It’s hard work. Just like you work to excel in your career, parenting, sport, or other pursuit. Marriages are not Netflix Originals where someone realizes the error of their ways, and decides to whisk you away in romcom fashion for a happily ever after.

It’s also not a dating app scenario where you get to swipe right if something doesn’t work in your favor. Don’t like the way he picks food from his teeth. Too bad. You’re committed. Unfortunately, we live in a challenging time in which a “disposable” mindset is so pervasive. Fragmented families, experience with unhealthy family and romantic relationships, and an instant gratification culture where you’re just an app, tap, and swipe away — can make commitment that much harder. Everyone comes from a different place, and everyone comes with their unique set of baggage.

So, let’s talk sustainability.

Great relationships take work because it’s worth the investment.

We are products of our childhood, upbringing, and cultural norms. Statistically speaking, children of divorced parents are more likely to jump ship. And, if your parents married others after divorcing, you’re 91% more likely to get divorced. (Source: Nicholas Wolfinger, Cambridge University Press 2005). 

But statistics are just numbers at the end of the day. Like Ben Stiller’s risk manager character in Along Came Polly, it’s best to throw the risk assessment out the window and commit to doing the work. And be your own best judge.

After reading key publications and articles on the subject (the work required is consistent), I’ve distilled the summary down to five points.

1) Be a good listener and ask questions

As a busy mom I am engrossed in work, caring for the kids, running errands, and juggling multiple projects. Being a good listener is one of the most important aspects of being a great partner. You can visibly see your partner’s reactions and emotions. We each have our own idiosyncrasies, and it’s important to be present for those we love.

2) Have high standards for each other

Having high standards for each other is crucial. There was a reason you got together in the first place and exchanged ‘I do’s.’ If something bothers you, address it immediately. Don’t tolerate negative or hurtful behavior on either side. Talk it out, and work on nipping the problem in the bud.

3) Learn to argue constructively

Sometimes you agree to disagree. It’s inevitable. I can have strong opinions as does the hubs. Arguing constructively means respecting the others’ opinion and exiting the argument gracefully. That may involve humor, a time-out from conversation, and sometimes just an acknowledgement that both views hold merit. Agree to disagree.

4) Show you care

I grew up in a household where “acts” (i.e. making a favorite meal, planning a special trip) spoke volumes when it came to love and commitment. For others, those acts aren’t enough. Some require more tactile or verbal demonstrations of care and love. Talk about and understand what your partner needs from you (and vice versa).

5) Plan regular date nights

Life gets in the way, and you find yourself frequently exhausted and drained. Having kids are an absolute delight, but it’s hard to schedule regular date nights. This is an area that can provide a great opportunity to re-connect, and just have fun.

Enjoy the journey (there will be bumps)

For my part, I am a work-in-progress and on this journey with my partner.

Yes, marriage is a lot of work. It has its ups and downs, and that’s par for the course. The down times can be incredibly tough, but it’s an opportunity for an honest relationship assessment, and a time to reboot with kindness and forgiveness.  I read a refreshing post (encourage you to read) by Winifred Reilly, a Marriage and Family Therapist, which gave her perspective on 36 years of marriage.

My parents have an amazing relationship and 40+ year marriage, which came from a shared journey with shared goals, and a belief in a happily ever after.

 

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19 thoughts on “Relationships are work (in a good way)

  1. I honestly think one of the biggest struggles of marriage is making time for each other outside of errands and daily chores! These are great tips!

    1. Yes, and at the end of a busy day, sometimes all I want to do is sleep. So, it definitely takes a mindset of making the time.

  2. Saying Relationships are hard work could be the understatement of the year, LOL. It takes so much kindness, patience, and commitment to make it grow and last– but you are right– its definitely worth it!

    1. It’s so true, and it’s easy to lose sight when other people around you try to convince you otherwise. There is only two people in a relationship, I remind myself.

  3. I believe there is no such thing as a perfect relationship. But with work from both sides, it can be a wonderful one. Indeed, a relationship doesn’t just “happen”, there is a lot of work involved into making sure that both are happy!

    1. A lot of us underestimate the importance of nurture and work. I’ve had to learn it myself, and often the hard way! Couldn’t agree more, and it has to come from both sides!

  4. You definitely captured the essence of a successful marriage. They will take work sometimes – people think it is all bliss and the honeymoon lives on forever. But with hard work comes success and it will show in your relationship.

  5. This is such a great post and I really enjoyed reading this article. It takes a lot of work in having a beautiful and a successful marriage and I thanked God that I found the perfect one that will stick with me thru ups and downs and who love and accepts even in my imperfections.

  6. It’s so true that relationships are work. There has to be two willing, hard working people to make a marriage work, but the benefits are so worth the work.

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